Sustainable Development Goals must sustain people and planet, experts say | March 20, 2013 | sciencedaily.com

Six Sustainable Development goals from U.N. to supersede Millennium Development Goals that expire 2015, based on new appreciation of anthropocene.

In the wake of last week’s meetings at the UN on the definition of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a group of international scientists have published a call in the journal Nature today, arguing for a set of six SDGs that link poverty eradication to protection of Earth’s life support. The researchers argue that in the face of increasing pressure on the planet’s ability to support life, adherence to out-dated definitions of sustainable development threaten to reverse progress made in developing countries over past decades. [….]

The team asserts that the classic model of sustainable development, of three integrated pillars — economic, social and environmental — that has served nations and the UN for over a decade, is flawed because it does not reflect reality. “As the global population increases towards nine billion people sustainable development should be seen as an economy serving society within Earth’s life support system, not as three pillars,” says co-author Dr. Priya Shyamsundar from the South Asian Network for Development and Environmental Economics, Nepal.

The researchers say that the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), set to expire in 2015, have helped focus international efforts on eight poverty-related goals. However, despite successes in some areas — the number of people living on less than one dollar a day has been more than halved — many MDGs have not been met, and some remain in conflict with one another. Economic gains, for example, have come at the expense of environmental protection. Politicians are struggling to link global environmental concerns with addressing poverty.

The new set of goals — thriving lives and livelihoods, food security, water security, clean energy, healthy and productive ecosystems, and governance for sustainable societies — aim to resolve this conflict. The targets beneath each goal include updates and expanded targets under the MDGs, including ending poverty and hunger, combating HIV/aids, and improving maternal and child health. But they also define a set of planetary “must haves”: climate stability, the reduction biodiversity loss, protection of ecosystem services, a healthy water cycle and oceans, sustainable nitrogen and phosphorus use, clean air and sustainable material use.

Sustainable Development Goals must sustain people and planet, experts say | March 20, 2013 | sciencedaily.com at http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130320155228.htm.  The full article is Griggs, David, Mark Stafford-Smith, Owen Gaffney, Johan Rockström, Marcus C. Öhman, Priya Shyamsundar, Will Steffen, Gisbert Glaser, Norichika Kanie, and Ian Noble. 2013. “Policy: Sustainable Development Goals for People and Planet.” Nature 495 (7441) (March 21): 305–307. doi:10.1038/495305a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/495305a.

The new graphic has earth’s support system with society inside, and the economy inside of that.
Redefining sustainable development

“Ending poverty and safeguarding Earth’s life support system must be the twin priorities for the Sustainable Development Goals, says Johan Rockström, centre director and a co-author of the Nature article.

Together with the international team he identified six goals that, if met, would contribute to global sustainability while helping to alleviate poverty. [….]

The new set of goals — thriving lives and livelihoods, food security, water security, clean energy, healthy and productive ecosystems, and governance for sustainable societies — aim to resolve this conflict. The targets beneath each goal include updates and expanded targets under the MDGs, including ending poverty and hunger, combating HIV/aids, and improving maternal and child health.

But also a set of planetary “must haves”: climate stability, reducing biodiversity loss, protection of ecosystem services, a healthy water cycle and oceans, sustainable nitrogen and phosphorus use, clean air and sustainable material use.

From “Redefining sustainable development” | March 20, 2013 | Stockholm Resilience Centre at http://www.stockholmresilience.org/21/research/research-news/3-20-2013-redefining-sustainable-development.html

The sidebar at the Stockholm Resilience Centre has a pointer to “Future Earth” as a 10-year international research initiative at the ICSU International Council for Science.

Johan Rockström introduces Future Earth | February 2013 | at http://vimeo.com/5720929 from http://vimeo.com/futureearth.

About

David Ing blogs at coevolving.com , photoblogs at daviding.com , and microblogs at http://ingbrief.wordpress.com . A profile appears at , and an independent description is on .

Tagged with: ,
Posted in Talk Video Streaming
2 comments on “Sustainable Development Goals must sustain people and planet, experts say | March 20, 2013 | sciencedaily.com
  1. Jack Ring says:

    As long as ‘scientists’ ignore the primary sustainable development goal, moderation of human reproduction, no amount of other actions will preserve the planet.

  2. Jack,

    I don’t disagree. In fact, there’s a great deal of benefit for maternal and child health in managing a lower rate of child births. Here’s my question and it may be bold, as we’ve been less than successful in using traditional approaches and in some parts of the world; well once a child is born and gender determined. I personally find it the wrong time to start population control.

    This said, with equality including the balance with women and men. Doesn’t it make sense to focus on sterilization for men? Prevention is key in my mind.

    Maybe we’ve taken the approach and had less than ideal outcomes?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Translate
Beyond this media queue
This content is syndicated to Twitter. For professional perspectives, look to Coevolving Innovations; for a photoblog, look to Reflections, Distractions.
  • How do Systems Changes become natural practice?
    The fourth of four lectures for the Systemic Design course at OCADU SFI focused on (a) situated practice + history-making (reframing disclosing new worlds), and on (b) commitments and the language-action perspective (applying conversations for action).
  • Whom, when + where do Systems Changes situate?
    The third of four lectures for the Systemic Design course at OCADU covered value(s), the science of service systems, and the socio-technical systems perspective.
  • Why (Intervene in) Systems Changes?
    A lecture on ecological systems for the OCADU SFI master's program opened up opportunities to discuss wei and wuwei, and get beyond an anthropocentric perspective the Canadian beaver in its habitat.
  • Are Systems Changes Different from System + Change?
    The second session of the Systemic Design course in the OCADU SFI master's program was an opportunity to share the current state of knowledge on Systems Change, in light of recent interest in Systems Change and Theory of Change.
  • Ecology and Economy: Systems Changes Ahead?
    A workshop with David L. Hawk at the CANSEE meeting in May 2019 led to an invitation to publish an article, "Ecology and Economy: Systems Changes Ahead?" in WEI Magazine.
  • Open Learning Commons, with the Digital Life Collective
    Questions about governance of online social communities led to launching on the Open Learning Commons and the Digital Life Collective, while issues of content moderation on a Facebook Group has reignited.
  • 2020/02 Moments February 2020
    Winter has discouraged enjoying the outside, so more occasions for friend and family inside.
  • 2020/01 Moments January 2020
    Back to school, teaching and learning at 2 universities.
  • 2019/12 Moments December 2019
    First half of December in finishing up course assignments and preparing for exams; second half on 11-day family vacation in Mexico City.
  • 2019/11 Moments November 2019
    Wrapped up paperwork on closing out family buildings in Gravenhurst, returned to classes and technical conferences in usual pattern of learning.
  • 2019/10 Moments October 2019
    Tightly scheduled weekdays at Ryerson Chang School, weekends in Gravenhurst clearing out family building as we're leaving the town permanently.
  • 2019/09 Moments September 2019
    Full month, winding down family business in Gravenhurst, starting Ryerson Chang certificate program in Big Data, with scheduled dinners with family and friends.
  • Plans as resources for action (Suchman, 1988)
    Two ways of thinking about practice put (i) “plans as determinants of action”, and (ii) “plans as resources for action”. The latter has become a convention, particularly through research into Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Computer Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW). While the more durable explanation appears the Suchman (1987) book (specifically sect […]
  • The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago
    Does “the best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago and the second best time is now” date back further than 1988? It is time to look long and hard at the value of the urban forest and create the broad-based efforts — in research, funding and citizen participation — needed to improve […]
  • 2019/11/05 13:15 “Barriers to Data Science Adoption: Why Existing Frameworks Aren’t Working”, Workshop at CASCON-Evoke, Markham, Ontario
    Workshop led by @RohanAlexander and @prof_lyons at #CASCONxEvoke on "Barriers to Data Science Adoption: Why Existing Frameworks Aren't Working". For discussion purposes the challenges are grouped within three themes: regulatory; investment; and workforce.
  • Own opinion, but not facts
    “You are entitled to your own opinions, but not to your own facts” by #DanielPatrickMoynihan is predated on @Freakonomics by #BernardMBaruch 1950 “Every man has a right to his own opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts”. Source: “There Are Opinions, And Then There Are Facts” | Fred Shapiro […]
  • R programming is from S, influenced by APL
    History of data science tools has evolved to #rstats of the 1990s, from the S-Language at Bell Labs in the 1970s, and the
  • Bullshit, Politics, and the Democratic Power of Satire | Paul Babbitt | 2013
    Satire can be an antidote, says Prof. #PaulBabbitt @muleriders , to #bullshit (c.f. rhetoric; hypocrisy; crocodile tears; propaganda; intellectual dishonesty; politeness, etiquette and civility; commonsense and conventional wisdom; symbolic votes; platitudes and valence issues).
Contact
I welcome your e-mail. If you don't have my address, here's a contact page.
%d bloggers like this: