Eric D. Beinhocker | “Beyond left and right: An evolutionary way of thinking about economics and public policy” (MP3 audio) | This View of Life on SoundCloud

Seeing the economy as a complex adaptive system may dissolve political positions of right and left, when approached from an evolutionary perspective.
Beyond left and right: An evolutionary way of thinking about economics and public policy by This View of Life on SoundCloud - Create, record and share your sounds for free

Eric D. Beinhocker is the author of The Origin of Wealth and a senior advisor to McKinsey & Company, Inc., where he conducts research on economics, management, and public policy issues. He was previously a partner at McKinsey and a co-leader of its global strategy practice. His career has bridged both the business and academic worlds. He has been a software CEO, a venture capitalist, and an Executive Director of the Corporate Executive Board. He has also held research appointments at the Harvard Business School and the MIT Sloan School of Management, and has been a visiting scholar at the Santa Fe Institute. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College and the MIT Sloan School of Management where he was a Henry Ford II Scholar.

Fortune magazine has named Beinhocker a “Business Leader of the Next Century,” and his writings on business and economics have appeared in a variety of publications, including the Financial Times.

Eric Beinhocker: Beyond left versus right: evolutionary economics and the future of policy and politics

For almost 150 years, our politics has been described in terms of ‘left versus right’.  While these terms encompass a broad range of ideas, historically, differing views on how to organize the economy have lay at the heart of this distinction.  For the past 30 years, neoclassical economic theory has dominated many areas of public policy-making (e.g. central bank macro models, cost-benefit analysis in climate change, and the “Washington Consensus” in economic development).  This talk will argue that modern views of the economy as an evolving, complex system present a radical challenge to these long established political and policy frameworks.  Hypotheses will be presented on how an evolutionary view of the economy may yield new political and policy frameworks.  An evolutionary view will not end political or policy disagreements, but may better align the space of argument with the nature of the system being argued about.

Group for Research in Organisational Evolution at http://www.uhbs-groe.org/abstracts.htm.

[MP3 audio]

Beyond left and right: An evolutionary way of thinking about economics and public policy by This View of Life on SoundCloud at http://soundcloud.com/this-view-of-life/david-sloan-wilson-talks-with.

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David Ing blogs at coevolving.com , photoblogs at daviding.com , and microblogs at http://ingbrief.wordpress.com . See .

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