jump to navigation

The Complicated Chinese Family Tree (streaming video) | Feb. 26, 2013 | Off the Great Wall March 7, 2013

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

Addressing Chinese extended family members is complicated, as it’s about each individual’s relation to the other.  Relatives are called not by their given names, but by the social tie.  The complicatedness is further confused as as person older than yourself (e.g. younger cousin) gets address differently from an person younger than yourself … and the gender factors in, too.

Did you know that every member of a Chinese family is called something different? Depending on whether it’s from your mom’s side or your dad’s side and their seniority? It gets quite confusing, so we will draw it out for you in a family tree and hope you can learn some Chinese along the way! :) Please don’t mind our terrible handwriting!

Watch the behind the scenes on how we created the family tree:http://e.ntd.tv/WefUsf

Note: There are still many more ways to call the same person, for example husband’s mother can be called 家姑,家婆,婆婆 or 奶奶. This all depends on where you are from. To keep it simple, we just chose the more generic terms.

Subscribe for more Off the Great Wall:http://e.ntd.tv/SubscribeOTGW

Another reason for trepidation in visiting the ancestral village this summer!

Video at The Complicated Chinese Family Tree (streaming video) | Feb. 26, 2013 | Off the Great Wall http://youtu.be/nCFRoILS1jY

Nassim Nicholas Taleb “The Fragility Crisis is Just Begun” (MP3 audio) | June 3, 2010 | Radio Open Source with Christopher Lydon March 4, 2013

Posted by daviding in Talk Audio Download, Talk Audio Streaming.
Tags: , , , ,
1 comment so far

In 2010, @nntaleb said newspapers give over-causation about a system’s environment, @RadioOpenSource read as “newspapers make us stupid” with their explanations. In the interview by Christopher Lydon with Nassim Nicholas Taleb (starting about about 27:00):

nassim-taleb.jpg

Taleb … In economic life, we don’t know, because we have a lot of superimposed complicated networks.

Lydon: Can I ask, what are the media implications of all of this? When Fox News can hold an enormous audience, that people dreamed of in the past, but in all of those local institutions, particularly newspapers, symbolically, and the idea of local opinion is fading out.

Taleb: I am against the news. I am not against the media. I am against supplying people with news about the environment that is very unnatural and causes collective consciousness to be divorced from one’s local one.

Lydon: You say newspapers make us stupid, and I’m not quite clear why.

Taleb: Because they always give you an explanation to events so that you have the feeling that you know what’s going on. They tell you the stock market went down, because of fear of a recession, and that’s false causation with uncertainty there. They check their facts, but you can’t check their causes. So, you have the feeling of over-causation from newspapers. That’s number one, the first one.

The second one: newspapers aren’t going to tell you “we had 280 deaths on the roads today in America”. They’re going to tell you about the plane crash killing 14 people. So, you have misrepresentation of the math of risks. They are driven by the sensational. And the statistical and the sensational are not the same in our modern world.

There’s a third thing about newspapers. Supplying someone with news reduces his understanding of the world. It’s more complicated than I can go into here, but let me tell you how I cope with it. I don’t mind knowing the news, but I go by a social filter. I each lunch and dinner with other people. (I try to. I still have people who won’t eat lunch or dinner with me, even after writing the Black Swan). And I make sure. You can eavesdrop on conversations and stuff like that. I can tell if something is going on.

If there’s an event of significance, I know about it. And then I go to the web, or go buy a paper sometimes, or something like that.

Lydon: Or go to Facebook, and get the real news!

Taleb: I don’t know. Facebook I don’t like, for some reason.

Lydon: But it does serve as kind of newspaper or a gossip place. You’ll hear about a great movie, or a great book, or a good restaurant.

Taleb: I don’t like these social things, on Facebook. Anything that draws me away from face-to-face contact with people is harmful to my health.

I fully believe in nature. I try not to spend too much time on the web, except to set up an appointment with someone, to contact my publisher, to complain to my banker, or to run the small businesses I’m in. I think that the Internet can take on a life of its own. It doesn’t make people happier. I’m happier living a life that is closer to my genetic background and what makes me happy. Socializing on Facebook is equivalent to eating these meals you used to see on science fiction movies, the meals that would make airplane food look like three-star Michelin.

The full interview covered content on fragility versus antifragility (i.e. robustness).

Taleb has revised and extended his cult classic, The Black Swan. His anomalous “black swan” (since swans are by definition white) has three properties: it’s (1) any one of those unforeseen developments that comes (2) with big consequences and (3) a concocted cause-and-effect after-story. In conversation, Taleb is trying to get us to let go of “causes” and fix on the word “fragility.”

Audio interview of Nassim Nicholas Taleb “The Fragility Crisis is Just Begun” | June 3, 2010 | Radio Open Source with Christopher Lydon at http://www.radioopensource.org/nassim-nicholas-taleb-the-fragility-crisis-is-just-begun/.

John Hagel | Rethinking Race Against the Machines (web video) | Dec. 17, 2012 | Big Think (on Youtube) February 23, 2013

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

Innovate by Racing WITH the Machine, says @jhagel, extending @erikbryn and @amcafee Racing Against the Machine where technology is an engine of change, leading to automation taking away jobs.  Counter with new work practices and institutions.

The traditional industrial push model of right people, right place, right time, following tightly activities to respond to demand where creativity not required can more easily be taken over by machines that are more predictable and reliable than human beings.

Opinion expressed by John Hagel | Rethinking Race Against the Machines (web video) | Dec. 17, 2012 | Big Think at http://youtu.be/XPHwzJS8mRY

Russell Ackoff’s 87th Birthday Celebration (video) | UNAM, Mexico City | February 2006 February 17, 2013

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

What’s the difference between a forecast and an assumption?  Ackoff illustrates through the metaphor of preparing for a flat tire.  What’s the difference between development and charity?  Teaching a man to fish, versus giving a man a fish.

Ackoff at UNAM — The National Autonomous University of Mexico

Javier Livas kindly shared the video that he took from the talk given by late Russell Ackoff at the conference on “Participation and Development: The Mexico of the Future.” The conference was in Mexico City: Celebrating Russell L. Ackoff’s 87th Anniversary, February 14 – 15, 2006.

Russ Ackoff had a long history of collaboration with Mexican scholars and professionals since the early 60’s. His planning methodology has been put into practice in several instances along a variety of institutions and corporations. All of the projects he has been involved in are unmistakably geared towards development with emphasis in stakeholder participation. His books in systems thinking, organizational design, development and other topics are widely used in Mexican universities. Many Mexican students as well as professionals have benefited from his thought by directly interacting with him as graduate students, in seminars, consulting or through personal communication.

The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) through the Institutes of Applied Mathematics and Systems (IIMAS), Engineering (II) and The School of Engineering (FI) organized the Symposium honoring Dr. Ackoff, focused on participation, development and the Mexico of the future.

To watch the video, click on the following link: ACKOFF AT UNAM

Video surfaced at “Ackoff at UNAM — The National Autonomous University of Mexico” | February 8, 2013 | Ackoff Collaboratory for Advancement fo the Systems Approach at http://ackoffcenter.blogs.com/ackoff_center_weblog/2013/02/ackoff-at-unam-the-national-autonomous-university-of-mexico.html.

[The video is supplemented with a photographic montage at the outset, and then settles in to a hand-held lecture]

2006_Ackoff_UNAM

“How to design breakthrough inventions” (David Kelley and IDEO profiled by Charlie Rose) | 60 Minutes | January 6, 2013 January 7, 2013

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
Tags: ,
add a comment

Design thinking profile by 60 Minutes (via @jp2consult) of David Kelley at Ideo and Stanford U.  Includes history with Steve Jobs and Apple, and ties with Stanford D-School.

“How to design breakthrough inventions” (David Kelley and IDEO profiled by Charlie Rose) | 60 Minutes | January 6, 2013 at http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=50138327n (where “web extras” are available).

Ward Cunningham | “Federation” | Oct. 24, 2012 | Realtime Conference December 13, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

@WardCunningham suggests the feedback loop is faster with a publish-and-review strategy, rather than a review-and-publish strategy.  The Wikipedia Neutral-Point-of-View works for history, but for future-oriented or individually-oriented content, there needs to be room for a chorus of voices.

[0:45] What does open data really need, especially in corporate environment, to be able to be share, and not be afraid of sharing?

[0:55] I’ve developed a new wiki, and it’s called the Federated Wiki.

[1:00] The project, which started before this application, was called the Smallest Federated Wiki, and did that at the Indie Web Camp.

[1:15]It reminded me that I was always guiltly that the everybody was bringing content to my site. When they finally said “why I am making Ward famous, I ought to start a blog”, I said yeah, you should. A lot of the real talent that was authoring on wiki — which was about patterns, and then design, and then extreme programming, and then agile — it was all hammered out on that site.

[1:50] Wikis have settled in, and made me famous.

7:15 Instead of having a review and publish strategy, I had a publish and then review strategy. [....] The feedback loop is 10 times faster, in some cases 100 times faster than on a traditional publication. [...] It had good signal-to-noise ratio, because I had a good feedback loop.

[9:00] Another thing that happened was the notion of recent changes. you could always find out about what people were talking about now. [....] That meant that you go away for a week, and come back, and catch up in an hour.

[10:30] This brings me to federation. [....]

[10:50] Let’s not all have our own wikis and just write to our own and read everybody else’s. It’s kind of like the blogosphere, except that we put enough affordance in there that it really does feel like a wiki. [...]

[11:10] There’s so much that we do with distributed computers, so that that distributed computer feels like one computer. Making that distributed computer feel like a bunch of computers is going to be good way to be for a number of things.

[11:30] In decision making, there’s something called groupthink. You have a pretty good idea, but somebody else mentions his pretty good idea, and it just shuts you down. You say, his pretty good idea is actually better than my pretty good idea, I’m going to forget my pretty good idea. But if you’re in a small community, isolated from that other pretty good idea, you can bat your idea around with a few people near you, and get it to be a really excellent idea, and it might have more potential than the other one. So, keeping thought leaders separate for a little while actually improves the quality of thinking.

[12:10] This is something that doesn’t happen on Wikipedia. They have a different rule. They say, everyone is editing the same pages, but you’re required to have a Neutral Point of View. If you’re talking about history, where it is possible, with enough consulting and references to assert that you really do have a Neutral Point of View, you can get away with it. It works on Wikipedia.

[12:35] But if you’re talking about forward-looking things, where it’s not clear what the right way to go is — and my work recently has been in sustainability, and I know there’s going to be change in the future, and I just want to inform that with good data — anything that is future oriented or individually oriented, there needs to be room for a chorus of voices. There needs to be a lot of ideas where we can make them all possible to express.

[13:15] With the idea of federation, I’m thinking that everyone brings something to the conversation. If all you’re bringing is spam to the conversation, you’re not going to get much attention.

[13:35] You bring some of your own storage, you bring your own bandwidth, you bring some of your own value that you might find unique. You have the opportunity to make your voice heard.

[14:00] On the blog, every time you start, you start on a blank page. On a wiki, you found a conversation, and improved it just a little. You take that idea that no one starts from a blank slate.

[15:30] One person asked me once, he said wikis are pretty neat, but do they have to be so ugly? The answer is yes, basically they do. If you make it beautiful, then anyone who can’t match your beauty is closed out of the conversation.

[19.30] This [page] comes up, and looks for something useful to its left. I don’t look anywhere, I just look to my left. These came off different websites. One came off my home web site, but the graph came off of my laptop. This data doesn’t meet until it shows up in my browser.

[21:40] As I write on this, I’m making stuff for myself, and then just sharing it widely. If somebody finds value in it, that’s great. I don’t have to write carefully. I said does wiki have to be ugly? It helps to be able to write casually.

[22:00] I call it incremental paragraphs. I write fragments, just thoughts, and I want to type as fast as I can. [....] But then I evolve into more powerful words. Here, I’m taking this fragmented ideas, and saying “if I had to name that today, what would I name that”? What are the powerful words that I should use in a sentence. This is inching towards making a new page.

[23:20] I write paragraphs that are standalone. Sometimes they get a little bigger. But it they get much bigger than that, hyperlink. I already thought about those names, push it off onto names.

[23:35] Sociologically, I think this is profound. I don’t like writing, but I do like being in a community. This is wiki for the Twitter generation.

[32:30] I’ve been focused on three things. Federation, refactoring, and applying those two to open data.

More videos by Ward Cunningham on Federated Wiki can be found at http://wardcunningham.github.com/

Ward Cunningham | “Federated Wiki Mashes Data in Your Browser” | May 31, 2012 | Fluent 2012 December 13, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

Ward Cunningham, inventor of wiki, rethinks wiki as a way of sharing data.

Our new wiki innovates three ways. It shares through federation, composes by refactoring and wraps data with visualization.

Returning to the pattern language research that predates the wiki, this rethinking supports the space as being alive, with computations on the page.  This Javascript-based wiki lives in the browser, with ties back to a server.  The Smallest Federated Wiki was demonstrated at Fluent 2012.

The result is computing where content can be copied and forked with personal points of view, learning from the distributed parallelism featured in Git technology.  Cunningham says (about about 11:15):

This is going to make a  kind of wiki where it isn’t a promise of a Neutral Point of View, but it’s a promise of attention to outcomes, attention to measurement.  You can have an opinion about how we should live our lives in the future, but you’ve got to tie that to realistic data.  In the blogosphere, you’ll have people off on one side yelling at people on the other side.  On Wikipedia, you have one place, and they all have to get along with this kind of Neutral Point of View.  I have something in between, where it’s kind of like the blogosphere where you get to be yourself, but it’s kind of like the wiki, where there’s a lot of incentive for understanding each other through all of this  the copying, and there’s data to be explained.

This is one of a series of videos on the Smallest Federated Wiki at http://wardcunningham.github.com/

Unlock the 007 in you | Oct., Nov. 2012 | cokezero December 6, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
add a comment

Challenging unprepared players for a 70-second adventure was described as “Gamification in Marketing” by Mind At Focus.  The resulting web video is practically as engaging as the 007 movie it promotes.

Equally entertaining is how some players are blocked or otherwise distracted from achieving a win.

 

“Disrupting a hundred-year-old institution” | Tuula Teeri, president, Aalto University | Nov. 22, 2012 | slush.fi December 6, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

Aalto U. as a kind of startup, says Tuula Teeri, president, responding to disruptions in a changing world.

Some points from her talk.

  • Disruption from forests to ecosystems, from mobile phones to smartphones, from printed news to tablet publications, from lecture hall to online learning.
  • University reform in Finland from 2010: Aalto University as a merged university from Helsinki University of Technology, School of Art and Design Helsinki, and Helsinki School of Economics.
  • Gave universities more autonomy, and now have to prove it’s been the right decision
  • Extra funding from government for 5 years, plus endowment capital.
  • The top ten jobs in 2010 didn’t exist in 2004, says Sony.
  • the amount of new technical information doubles every two years, which means that half of what is taught to students in first year is outdated by their third year in university.
  • The answer: bottom up initiatives, in multidisciolinary learning by doing in Design Factory, Media Factory and Service Factory — using theoretical knowledge in real-world problems.
  • New learning environments, Aalto on Waves on boats, and Aalto on Tracks on trains, not just learning events, designed with students.
  • Open Innovation House new in 2012.
  • Aalto Center for Entrepreneurship, will have education and research into building an effective innovation accelerator.

Chrystia Freeland | “Wealth Disparity, Income Inequality” | Nov. 30, 2012 | rotman.utoronto.ca December 4, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
Tags: , ,
1 comment so far

After the book on Plutocracy by @cafreeland started in 2008, she thought the Global Financial Crisis would end that title, but it’s turned out that the gap between the Super-Rich and the poor has widened even more.

SPEAKER: Chrystia Freeland, Global Editor-at-Large and Columnist, Reuters News; Author, Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super-Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else (Penguin, 2012)

TOPIC: Wealth Disparity, Income Inequality, and the New Global Elite; Social and Economic History Experts Speaker Series @ Rotman
Taped November 30, 2012

 

Clay Shirky | How the Internet will (one day) transform government | June 2012 | ted.com October 30, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
Tags: ,
add a comment

The idea of open source in government isn’t so new, but the extrapolation by @cshirky of Github out of the developers domain into a wider application is new.

On my to-do list is to look at some of the Top 10 Git Tutorials for Beginners.

Clay Shirky | How the Internet will (one day) transform government | June 2012 (published September 2012) | ted.com at http://www.ted.com/talks/clay_shirky_how_the_internet_will_one_day_transform_government.html

The low-cost tablets battling Apple in India | LJ Rich | May 19, 2012 | BBC Click June 6, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
add a comment

Innovator’s dilemma of laptops to tablets in India, reports @ljrich, target price 1/6 of iPad, with @Datawind Aakash on @BBCClick.

Around one sixth of the world’s population live in India but how do you encourage more of the population to use tablets outside of the already connected cities?

LJ Rich takes a look at the cheap tablets wanting to take a bite out of Apple’s dominance.

The low-cost tablets battling Apple in India | LJ Rich | May 19, 2012 | BBC Click at http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/click_online/9722033.stm.

Andy Stanford-Clark | “Innovation Begins at Home” (web video) | March 22, 2012 | YouTube March 24, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Video Streaming.
add a comment

The Internet of Things, by Andy Stanford-Clark, from innovation at home, into the community and beyond into larger systems of systems.

Dr Andy Stanford-Clark is a Distinguished Engineer and Master Inventor at IBM UK. He specialises in technologies which are helping to make the planet smarter, by analysing and reacting to data from remote sensors. He is Fellow of the British Computer Society and a Visiting Professor at the University of Newcastle.

Andy Stanford-Clark | “Innovation Begins at Home” (web video) | March 22, 2012 | YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9nrm8q5eGg.

Geoffrey Bowker, “Memory Practices in the Sciences” (MP3 audio) | Feb. 5, 2008 | Library Cafe, WVKR-FM March 22, 2012

Posted by daviding in Uncategorized.
add a comment

Scientific knowledge has changed from its19th century origins, through 20th century industrialization into 21st century information economy.  Have practices changed?
library-cafe.org

Geoffrey C. Bowker, Regis and Dianne McKenna Professor and Executive Director of the Center for Science, Technology, and Society at Santa Clara University, discusses his book, Memory Practices in the Sciences, winner of the 2007 Ludwig Fleck Prize of the Society for Social Studies and Science, and named the “Best Information Book of 2006″ by the American Society for Information Science & Technology, published by MIT.

[MP3 audio]

Geoffrey Bowker, “Memory Practices in the Sciences” (MP3 audio) | Feb. 5, 2008 | Library Cafe, WVKR-FM http://library-cafe.blogspot.ca/2008/01/geoffrey-c-bowker.html

Jason Hwang | “The Innovators Prescription” (MP3 audio) | Jan. 18, 2012 | The Brad Brooks Show March 22, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Audio Download.
add a comment

Healthcare in the U.S. may be trapped in its own thinking, so a radical outside perspective could be an alternative approach.
The Brad Brooks Show - Jason Hwang - The Innovators Prescription | Guests

Jason Hwang, M.D., M.B.A. is an internal medicine physician and Executive Director of Healthcare at Innosight Institute, a non-profit social innovation think tank based in San Francisco, CA. Together with Professor Clayton M. Christensen of Harvard Business School and the late Jerome H. Grossman of Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

Previously, Dr. Hwang taught as chief resident and clinical instructor at the University of California, Irvine, where he received multiple recognitions for his clinical work. He has also served as a clinician with the Southern California Kaiser Permanente Medical Group and the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Long Beach, California. Dr. Hwang received his B.S. and M.D. from the University of Michigan and his M.B.A. from Harvard Business School.

[MP3 audio]

Jason Hwang | The Innovators Prescription | Jan. 18, 2012 | The Brad Brooks Show at http://www.thebradbrooksshow.com/Guests/jason-hwang-the-innovators-prescription.html.

Eric D. Beinhocker | “Beyond left and right: An evolutionary way of thinking about economics and public policy” (MP3 audio) | This View of Life on SoundCloud March 16, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Audio Download.
add a comment

Seeing the economy as a complex adaptive system may dissolve political positions of right and left, when approached from an evolutionary perspective.
Beyond left and right: An evolutionary way of thinking about economics and public policy by This View of Life on SoundCloud - Create, record and share your sounds for free

Eric D. Beinhocker is the author of The Origin of Wealth and a senior advisor to McKinsey & Company, Inc., where he conducts research on economics, management, and public policy issues. He was previously a partner at McKinsey and a co-leader of its global strategy practice. His career has bridged both the business and academic worlds. He has been a software CEO, a venture capitalist, and an Executive Director of the Corporate Executive Board. He has also held research appointments at the Harvard Business School and the MIT Sloan School of Management, and has been a visiting scholar at the Santa Fe Institute. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College and the MIT Sloan School of Management where he was a Henry Ford II Scholar.

Fortune magazine has named Beinhocker a “Business Leader of the Next Century,” and his writings on business and economics have appeared in a variety of publications, including the Financial Times.

Eric Beinhocker: Beyond left versus right: evolutionary economics and the future of policy and politics

For almost 150 years, our politics has been described in terms of ‘left versus right’.  While these terms encompass a broad range of ideas, historically, differing views on how to organize the economy have lay at the heart of this distinction.  For the past 30 years, neoclassical economic theory has dominated many areas of public policy-making (e.g. central bank macro models, cost-benefit analysis in climate change, and the “Washington Consensus” in economic development).  This talk will argue that modern views of the economy as an evolving, complex system present a radical challenge to these long established political and policy frameworks.  Hypotheses will be presented on how an evolutionary view of the economy may yield new political and policy frameworks.  An evolutionary view will not end political or policy disagreements, but may better align the space of argument with the nature of the system being argued about.

Group for Research in Organisational Evolution at http://www.uhbs-groe.org/abstracts.htm.

[MP3 audio]

Beyond left and right: An evolutionary way of thinking about economics and public policy by This View of Life on SoundCloud at http://soundcloud.com/this-view-of-life/david-sloan-wilson-talks-with.

Geoffrey Hodgson, “Evolutionary Thinking and Its Policy Implications for Modern Capitalism” (MP3 audio) | Sept. 22, 2011 |This View of Life, SoundCloud March 16, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Audio Download.
add a comment

Economists who cite Darwin may consider a deeper reading, or looking at the interpretation by Geoffrey Hodgson.
Evolutionary Thinking and Its Policy Implications for Modern Capitalism by This View of Life on SoundCloud

David Sloan Wilson interviews economist Geoffrey Hodgson at a workshop organized by the Group for Research in Organizational Evolution. Check out the workshop here http://www.uhbs-groe.org/p7.htm

Geoff  Hodgson: The Evolution of Morality and the End of Economic Man

1871 saw the publication of major treatises in the development of neoclassical economics, with self-seeking economic man as its centrepiece. In the same year Darwin published The Descent of Man, which emphasised sympathy and cooperation as well as self-interest, and contained a powerful argument that morality has evolved in humans by natural selection. Essentially this stance is supported by modern research. This paper considers the nature of morality and how it has evolved. It reconciles Darwin’s notion that a developed morality requires language and deliberation (and is thus unique to humans), with Darwin’s other view that moral feelings have a long-evolved and biologically-inherited basis. The social role of morality and its difference with altruism is illustrated by an agent-based simulation. The fact that humans combine both moral and selfish dispositions has major implications for the social sciences and must oblige us to abandon the pre-eminent notion of selfish economic man.

via Group for Research in Organisational Evolution at http://www.uhbs-groe.org/abstracts.htm.

[MP3 audio]

“Evolutionary Thinking and Its Policy Implications for Modern Capitalism” by This View of Life on SoundCloud at http://soundcloud.com/this-view-of-life/evolutionary-thinking-and-its.

Lawrence Busch | “Standards: Recipes for Reality” (MP3 audio) | July 15, 2011 | Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics (FARE), University of Guelph March 16, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Audio Download.
add a comment

Standards can help economic and social progress not only in technologies, but also in agriculture.
FARE Talk - Food, Agricultural & Resource Economic Podcasts

Dr. Lawrence Busch [in] his book “Standards: Recipes for Reality.” … argues that standards play a central role in constructing reality. We discuss this argument in general and examine the important role that standards play in contemporary agriculture. In this context we discuss the system of standards, certifications, and accreditation that, in part, shape our economy. Dr. Busch also provides guidelines for developing fair, equitable, and effective standards.

Dr. Lawrence Busch is University Distinguished Professor in the Center for the Study of Standards in Society in the Department of Sociology at Michigan State University. More details about him and his forthcoming book can be found at http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=12691

[MP3 audio]

Lawrence Busch | “Standards: Recipes for Reality” (MP3 audio) | July 15, 2011 | Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics (FARE), University of Guelph at http://fare.uoguelph.ca/FARE-talk/index.html#recipes.

David Sloan Wilson, “The Psychopathic Chicken (and Other Lessons of Evolution)” (MP3 audio) | August 27, 2008 | Culture Snob March 16, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Audio Download.
add a comment

Evolution is often portrayed in the biological frame.  It can also be relevant in viewing systems in other frames.
The Psychopathic Chicken (and Other Lessons of Evolution) | Books | Culture Snob

[David Sloan] Wilson, a distinguished professor of biology and anthropology at Binghamton University in Binghamton, New York, is one of the primary advocates for an interdisciplinary application of the principles of evolution — the idea that Charles Darwin’s theory has much to tell us about humans and their cultures. He created his university’s Evolution Studies program and would like to see other colleges and universities embrace evolution similarly. “It’s sort of become my mission to incorporate this into higher education,” Wilson said last week in a phone interview.

His goal is first to make evolution accessible (and acceptable) by showing how the theory can be used to explain human behavior — a sensitive subject that had been largely off-limits until the past two decades.

He lays out his premise at the outset of Evolution for Everyone:

“This is a book of tall claims about evolution: that it can become uncontroversial; that the basic principles are easy to learn; that everyone should want to learn them, once their implications are understood; that evolution and religion, those old enemies who currently occupy opposite corners of human thought, can be brought harmoniously together.”

The aim of the desert-island morality example, then, is to see Darwin’s theory in human practice. As Wilson explains, it’s critical for people to understand that evolution isn’t just biology. It can explain why altruism exists in society against the apparent self-interest of its individual members.

“If you can’t address an issue like that,” he said, “then nobody’s going to accept the theory of evolution.”

[MP3 audio]

David Sloan Wilson, “The Psychopathic Chicken (and Other Lessons of Evolution)” (MP3 audio) | August 27, 2008 | Culture Snob http://www.culturesnob.net/2008/08/psychopathic-chicken/

David Weinberger | “Too Big to Know: How the new dimensions of information are transforming business — and life” (MP3 audio) | November 30, 2011 | School of Information, U.C. Berkeley March 15, 2012

Posted by daviding in Talk Audio Download.
add a comment

Systems designed around information scarcity and inaccessibility in the agricultural and industrial ages are giving way to a world of abundance in information so easily accessible.

Too Big to Know: How the new dimensions of information are transforming business — and life | School of Information

… our old system of knowledge was based around the limitations of paper, a disconnected, expensive medium that managed a world that was too big to know by cutting down on what we had to deal with. There were of course advantages to that, but they came at the cost of throwing out most of what the world was trying to tell us.

In the new knowledge ecology, knowledge takes on the properties of its new medium, the Net. That means knowledge has become huge, it’s connected, and it embraces disagreement and differences. The key is to think about knowledge not as a set of content but as a network: the smartest person in the room is now the room itself. Then the question is, how can you build, maintain, and nurture a smart network?

David Weinberger is one of the most respected thought-leaders at the intersection of technology, business, and society. He is a co-author of the bestselling book, The Cluetrain Manifesto — which InformationWeek called “the most important business book since In Search of Excellence” — and is the author of Everything is Miscellaneous and Small Pieces Loosely Joined.

Weinberger’s new book, Too Big to Know, explores how the networking of knowledge is transforming expertise and decision-making in business, government, education, and science.

[MP3 audio]

David Weinberger | “Too Big to Know: How the new dimensions of information are transforming business — and life” (MP3 audio) | November 30, 2011 | School of Information, U.C. Berkeley http://www.ischool.berkeley.edu/newsandevents/events/distinguishedlectures/davidweinberger.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.